Tag Archive | Infection Prevention

It’s all in the herbs: How traditional medicine shapes rabies treatment

By Karissa Magnuson
Student, Ohio State College of Veterinary Medicine

During our time here in Ethiopia, we have been surprised to find out how often people, especially in rural settings, believe and prefer a traditional healer instead of modern medical doctor. My curiosity on this subject led to me to do a little research online into the prevalence of traditional healers in Ethiopia as well as traditional treatments for rabies proposed by these healers.

Traditional medicine dates as far back as the 15th century in Ethiopia and consists not only of herbal remedies but also of animal and mineral-based concoctions as well as spiritualistic rituals and aromatherapy. Most traditional healers have learned their trade from a family member, and like doctors, these healers go through both a physical exam and history when they examine their patient.

Not surprisingly, many modern health care workers do not support traditional medicine; however, there are some that feel collaboration between traditional and modern healers could provide the best treatment for patients.

In my research I was shocked to discover that up to 80% of Ethiopians use traditional medicine as their primary source of health care. (A historical overview of traditional medicine practices and policy in Ethiopia.) Being from a country where modern medicine is viewed as infallible, with Chinese and other traditional medicine slowly gaining some credence in the U.S., an 80% preference rate is surprising.

So is there any stock in traditional medicine in the treatment of rabies? In my search, I found remedies which have included the use of skullcap on wounds (This herb tends to have astringent effects, antiseptic effects on wounds, and anti-anxiety effects.) Garlic was also frequently mentioned for treatment. I was shocked to discover that garlic has been found to have some effects on paralytic disorders. The bark of Alangium salviforium, a flowering plant, has also been indicated as a possible treatment and has been proven to have anti-epileptic effects. The main question that I am left with is: Are these treatments and herbs effective or is traditional medicine hindering rabies eradication in Ethiopia? Or perhaps, it warrants further research and possibly future collaborative efforts in the cure and eradication of rabies within this amazing country. Only more research will tell.

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Show and Tell: Our “First Kits” in Ethiopia’s Simien Mountains

tim landers 3

By: Tim Landers, RN, PhD
Ohio State College of Nursing

This past weekend, we had a chance to take a hiking tour of the Simien mountains in Ethiopia.  This has to be one of the most beautiful places on earth – the landscapes are gorgeous, the people are smiling and proud, and there is plenty of wildlife.

I have done quite a bit of hiking with my two sons and friends from Boy Scout Troop 33 in Columbus.  As we were hiking across the Simien mountain pass, our guide and I chatted about our experiences hiking and guiding groups.

Melese Beza (of www.outstandingsimienmountainstours.com) grew up tending livestock as a shepherd and works as a professional tour guide through the mountains as he completes his bachelor’s degree in tourism management.  He speaks English quite well and we began to talk about the types of health problems he encounters as a professional hiking guide.

We took a break as it began to rain and started a “show and tell” of our first aid kits.  He had a basic kit ready for the main emergencies from African trekking – including what he adoringly called “potions” such as acetaminophen, wound disinfectant, and diarrheal medications.

Simien Mountain tour guide Melese Beza of Outstanding Simien Mountains Tours and Tim Landers, RN, PhD do a show and tell of their first aid kits during a rain break while trekking through the Simien Mountains north of Gondar, Ethiopia.

Ohio State’s Tim Landers and Simien Mountain tour guide Melese Beza do a “show and tell” of their first aid kits during a rain break while trekking through the Simien Mountains north of Gondar, Ethiopia.

The two take turns with their "show and tell" on first aid.

The two take turns with their “show and tell” on first aid.

He used somewhat different terms, but described several conditions which would be expected – ankle “dislocations” (strains/sprains), altitude sickness, injuries from rock falls (abrasions and cuts), and blood sugar emergencies.  He also described unfortunate drowning victims he recalled from last summer and that they had attempted “breath blowing” with success in one victim.

In my training back home, we’ve prepared for emergency evacuation of wounded hikers by helicopter transport, extricating from deep woods by foot and by vehicle, and most of our Scouts have completed training in first aid and CPR.

In this region of Ethiopia, there is no such option.  There are no helicopter evacuations from the Simien Mountains.  Guides call for help and it will come as soon as word can reach the village by foot and a jeep, configured as an ambulance, can make it to the wounded person.

As we discussed how injured hikers are treated and our own experiences, I was impressed with his solid grasp on these conditions.  He has been working with several other guides trying to organize a more formal training in first aid and CPR for Simien Mountain guides.

Because our group is exploring the possibility of working with nurses and health extension workers to do health education, I was able to direct him to some excellent training resources developed by my friends at Columbia University School of Nursing. They have developed a fine first aid training curriculum in first aid for health extension workers.

I left him with some supplies from my kit and he reciprocated by sharing knowledge of local plants and remedies.

He left me with an appreciation for the training and preparation it takes to safely enjoy the outdoors – whether it is in Ohio or in Ethiopia.

Hand-in-hand on hygiene in a hospital setting

Tim Landers, RN, PhD, from Ohio State’s College of Nursing and Nora Mohammed, MSc, from University of Gondar -- an infection prevention hero!

Tim Landers, RN, PhD, from Ohio State’s College of Nursing and Nora Mohammed, MSc, from University of Gondar — an infection prevention hero!

By Tim Landers, RN, PhD
Ohio State College of Nursing

“Are you from Ohio? Will you talk to me?”

Nura stopped me in the courtyard of the University of Gondar hospital. She was waving my business card that had been given to her from a School of Nursing instructor who knew that my work centers on infection prevention.

She had just defended her Master’s thesis on hand hygiene at the University of Gondar in which she completed an audit of hand hygiene practices by nurses and other health care workers at a local hospital. When she told me about her project, I was very excited to learn more, so we met the next day to review her findings.

Improving hand hygiene saves lives. Reducing transmission of germs on the hands of health care workers is the most important means of preventing infections.  A recent article of mine on patient-centered hand hygiene is here. Another important article on the subject is here.

Effective hand hygiene programs use a multimodal approach, including strong administrative support, education, training, monitoring of hand-washing and feedback. A critical element of hand hygiene programs is providing products and supplies in the health care setting, and I’ve worked on the best approach for years.

But I had forgotten how critical the provision of products is in our hand hygiene efforts. Without a sink, running water, soap, or alcohol-based hand rubs, hand hygiene is simply not possible.

Quite frankly, I had come to take this for granted.

Until I met Nora.

In her study, Ms. Mohammed showed that in more than half of the “hand hygiene opportunities” – times when workers should perform hand hygiene – no soap, running water, or alcohol-based hand-rubs were available at this hospital. As a former nursing matron, or director of nursing, she saw the impact this had on patient outcomes.

By demonstrating the need to improve access, her study provides an important first step in improving hand hygiene practices.

I was really excited to meet someone who shares a passion for infection prevention and hand hygiene. She really is making a difference at her hospital and helping to save lives in Gondar. In the U.S., we call them “heroes!”

Yes, I am from Ohio, and I would love to talk to you!